Developing the Leaders Around You

https://peterstark.com/tag/learning/

Session one 

Concept/principle:

“To add growth, lead followers… to multiply, lead leaders.”  

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership 

What does it mean?

This law states that if a leader wants to grow a little bit, they should lead people who will follow them; however, if a leader wants to grow a lot – or multiply their growth – they should lead people who are leaders. One way to think about this principle is that people can’t develop on their own. By leading followers, a leader will only be able to grow a limited amount. On the other hand, if a leader leads other leaders, that person will be able to learn from the people that they are leading, and their growth will multiply.  

Why did I choose this principle?  

I chose this principle because very often I feel that when I am leading, I forget that the goal is not to lead people who will just follow, but to lead people who will also lead. This principle can certainly help me in the future, whether it is in TALONS or later in my learning career 

How am I going to apply this principle to future leadership activities?  

I am going to use this principle while planning cultural events, leadership events and adventure trips in the future. Since we plan all of these occasions alongside the grade nines, the other grade tens and I will help mentor the TALONS in the grade below us. I will remember this concept during the planning processes and make sure that the grade nines are using the skills they will learn to develop into leaders. Because, if I can start leading leaders, I can start learning from those leaders. When the grade nines further developing their leadership styles, I will be able to discover different ways to approach situations and challenges.  

Session two 

Concept/principle:

The two characteristics of leaders:  

1. They are going somewhere.  

2. They are able to persuade others to go with them.  

What does it mean?

These two characteristics of leaders help define what makes a person a leader. The first characteristic, “they are going somewhere,” indicates that a leader needs to have a vision. A leader needs to know where they are headed, so that they can effectively lead others who will hopefully help the leader go where they want to go. The second characteristic, “they are able to persuade others to go with them,” indicates that a leader needs to be able to convince the people they lead to help them reach their destination. If a leader is able to persuade others to go with them, their journey will be a lot easier and more successful.  

Why did I choose this principle?  

I chose this principle because I felt that it is a great way to view leading. The first characteristic gives a leader a reason to lead. If you have no destination in mind, there is no reason for you lead others. The second characteristic gives a leader a goal to strive for. The leader not only has to have a destination in mind, they have to be able to convince others of that same objective. I think that these two characteristics delve deep into the why of leadership when analyzed closely.  

How am I going to apply this principle to future leadership activities?  

I am going to use this principle to help me in future leadership activities by considering these two characteristics while leading. I will ask myself, “am I going somewhere? Do I have a vision of where this is taking me?” If the answer is no, I will reconsider my goals for the project. Once the answer to these questions is yes, I will ask myself, “am I persuading others to come with me while reaching my vision?” If the answer is no, I need to find a way to get others on track with my idea and goal. I can do this by asking for feedback and input on where I picture our project or event going.  

Session three 

Concept/principle:  

I model.  

What does it mean?

This concept can be paraphrased by saying that people do what people see, so a leader should do what they want the people they lead to do. John C. Maxwell says that there are two types of leaders, the “travel agents” and the “tour guides.” A leader that does not model is a travel agent, sending the people they lead to places they’ve never been to. A leader that models is a tour guide, taking the people they lead to places the leader has been to many times. Norman Vincent Peale said, “nothing is more confusing that people who give good advice and set bad examples.” The people being discussed in this quote would be travel agent leaders, as they do not model.  

Why did I choose this principle?  

I chose this concept because as a leader, you cannot gain credibility by being a travel agent leader. A respected leader will model how they expect the people they lead to behave. As a grade ten in TALONS, I want to be a good model for the grade nines, so that next year they can become good leaders for the new grade nines.  

How am I going to apply this principle to future leadership activities?  

I am going to apply this concept to future leadership activities by making sure that I model good behaviour for the grade nines. I will be as organized as possible; I will work efficiently; I will help others when they need it. By modeling this behaviour, I will hopefully become a more credible and respected leader. For example, when working on a leadership event, I will make sure that every aspect of the project is being organized as best as possible, and I will work efficiently so that I have time to help others who are a bit behind or are confused.  

Session four 

Concept/principle:  

Pools of people at each level of growth.  

Page 126 – John C. Maxwell’s Developing The Leaders Around You

What does it mean?

The pools of growth indicate the amount a leader has grown. The first level is the largest, meaning that most people are situated in the level with “some growth.” The second pool is a little bit smaller than the first one, which means that there are still many people who fall in the category of having “growth that makes them capable in their job,” although there are less people in this pool than in level one. Every level increases in growth and decreases in the amount of people. When applying these pools of growth to developing leaders around you, the first two levels will probably provide producers, not reproducers. At level three, the producers become reproducers. Levels four, five and six are when reproducers become critical members of an organization 

Why did I choose this principle?  

I chose this concept because these pools of growth are a good way to measure my growth during a certain period of time. In my school career, I hope to grow as much as possible, and I can use these pools to measure my growth. It is also a reminder that I want to reach level six. Returning to the previous concept in session twothe two characteristics of leaders, I am going to level six, and I will keep this vision in mind while persuading others to come with me to this sixth pool of growth.  

How am I going to apply this principle to future leadership activities?  

I am going to use the pools of growth to measure my growth after certain activities in leadership. For example, after planning my leadership event, I will think about what pool I was in before the event, and I will consider if I changed pools. I will keep the goal of reaching level six in mind while planning events and learning in leadership classes.  

https://sites.psu.edu/leadership/2016/05/21/trait-approach-to-leadership/